Become a Fan

Support the Revolution!


Connect with WDR

WDR Shirts


Who Dey Revolution Manifesto

  • Preamble

    IN THIS TIME of perpetual Cincinnati Bengals incompetence and futility, with zero playoff wins in the nineteen seasons since the WhoDeyRevolution Godfather, Paul Brown, passed away in 1991 and handed the team to his fortunate son, the Despot, Mike Brown;

    Introduction

    WE, the members of the Who Dey Revolution, in our fervent dedication to the Cincinnati Bengals and fanatical desire to transform our hometown team into perpetual Super Bowl contenders, call for a popular revolution of fans to demand comprehensive reform to the managerial decisions and approach of Cincinnati Bengals ownership, management, staff and players, and hereby call for the adoption of the following Who Dey Revolution Manifesto:

    Manifesto Demands

    THAT the Mike Brown, Katie Blackburn, Marvin Lewis, along with every other member of the Bengals management, staff and personnel, state publicly to all Bengals fans, “I will do everything in my power to help the Cincinnati Bengals win a Super Bowl;”

    THAT Mike Brown will hire a general manager, drastically expand the scouting department and relinquish all control of player personnel;

    THAT all training, rehabilitation and medical facilities are considered best-in-class compared to other NFL teams;

    THAT the management fill the team only with players who fit the system, both mentally and physically, and are not reluctant to makes changes to player personnel when needed, regardless of cost or loyalty concerns;

    THAT offensive and defensive line depth is considered the top priority for all player personnel decisions;

    THAT all decisions made by ownership, management, staff and players, both on and off the field, are judged only by this criterion: “Does this help the Cincinnati Bengals win a Super Bowl?”

Inaugural Post

Email Us

« Discount! | Main | Remember the "Concessions" the Bengals Offered on Their Stadium Deal? Neither do the County Commissioners »

June 30, 2010

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e550080ede883301348517573c970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference My Old Nemesis: the Draw Play:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Interesting--I thought the name SWB came from Chris Berman. I also hated the draw plays called on offense. Like you mentioned, they were not only called on 3rd and long and resulted in punts, but the scenario that makes me tear my hair out is when they sit on the ball at the end of the half using a combination of these draws and kneel downs. It's basically a gutless move signaling a white flag of surrender. I hate it. Step on throats, move the ball and get a FG before the half--be aggressive. I will say this though: how sweet is it when it's 3rd and 8 and on the rare occasion they get a first down on a stupid draw play? It makes me laugh because I know either the Bengals are having a really good day offensively and can literally move the ball at will, or that they've been playing so horribly that a stupid play like that would be the only thing working.

Yeah, Berman coined the nickname, but it just seemed appropriate because Bieniemy is just one of the players I most associate with the time of futility in the 90s.

And yes, we suck at the draw on offense. I'm almost fine with them not using it, like last year, except that if we're gonna be so run heavy you'd think it would provide a creative way to change up the run game from time to time. Well, you'd think at least.

Bengals draw of the 90's = Brat's shovel pass of the modern era. I know it's blasphemy to use Tab Perry and Brian Leonard in the same sentence (because Leonard must! be related to Charles Norris, for otherwise there would be no explanation for his preternatural grittiness), but Brat doesn't seem to know the difference between the two.

Another futile play for our offense, but so successful against our defense in the past has been the dreaded screen pass.

I know our defense is a hell of a lot better now, but I still hold my breath when I see this play beginning to develop b/c I am so used to seeing something like this (especially during a Steelers game): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWiduRYw88k or this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8edb7b9TMlA

I still have nightmares of Willie Parker getting around Justin Smith at will for a long gain...

Meanwhile on the opposite side of the ball, it always seemed like we get this as a result of calling the same play: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZQcJrkytm8 or this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJ7cjmzTvHM

Thank god for Zimmer, I don't believe we will see long plays like that again unless two of our guys get hurt during the play. Now if we can only upgrade Brat...

On a side note, I bought my first fantasy football mag since I need to catch up with what the other teams have been doing. Complete waste of my money. I love how the fantasy mags have the Bengals D ranked in the 20's and Stephen Jackson is still rated over Ced Benson. These "experts" don't have a clue. Personally, I plan on picking the Def late since I think they will be nasty this year. With an increase in pressure, we should see an increase in turnover opportunities.

Re the 90s: I'd much rather see a draw on 3rd and 9 than a 5-yd buttonhook to Warrick. I never understood how putting the smallest guy on the team in the middle of the field with his back to a LB at the moment he touches the ball could possibly be a good idea.

Hmmm...in retrospect, blesterov, you are correct. The screen pass probably killed us even more on defense than the draw play. On offense the draw was always the worst though.

blestrov, I shuddered when watching those clips. It still hurts to watch. I know those plays defined the 90's, but Bresnahan had no idea what to do against them either. I'm not sure he had ever heard of draws or screen passes. I know Dave Shula hadn't.

Not sure where your confusion comes from. Since the draw only works when you have a decent passing game, I can understand why we had the lowest percentage of draw calls last year. Makes perfect sense.

It's ironic too when you consider that Paul Brown invented the draw play.

It took you this long to figure that out? I've been railing on this for over a decade!

In all seriousness, the draw play should ONLY be used on a semi-regular basis to position your kicker in the center of the field. Other than that, it really is a 'gadget' play. One cannot go to the well too often with this play.

The problem I had with this play was that it was employed on a (invariably) 3rd and 22 yards. You already have the defense playing a form of 'prevent' defense so you are not going to bust off 25 yards unless at least three defensive player miss the ball carrier. At this level, the likelihood of that happening is 'Slim and None --- and Slim is out of town.'

This play DID work at one time but it was more about the player running that play than anything else. Remember Big Pete Johnson?

Remember that I said you needed to have three defenders miss? Well, you aren't going to run away from them to get them to miss. That means you have to run them over. 280lbs. Johnson WAS capable of doing that. He had the ability to run after the first contact as well. See that didn't work as well for Brooks, Bienemy, Harry etc.

A combination of defensive players getting bigger and more powerful made it so that even Johnson couldn't slug through a defense for more than the proverbial eight yards. THat's just the evolution of the game.

THe use of a draw these days is to stop from going into the line and cathing the tight end cutting over the middle ten two twelve yards deep -- or a fake run and an rolling option to pass by the running back. Draw the defense up (which is what, by default, a draw play does...) have the Wideout give a chuck to the cornerback so as to sell the idea of it being a run, then break in behind the CB and voila`! Easy six points. Of cource this precludes the idea that the CB is trying to jump the run and you just allow there to be an exploit of his natural tendencies. If the CB stays 'home' then you just try to take him out of the play by stretching him away from the action point. Eventually, if the yards are given up inside, then the CB will try to jump the play -- Six points! He's not going to stand for the opposition getting seven yards at their whim and he can't have any effect on it.

You just move the wideout closer to the line and make it more inviting to the CB to want to influence the play 'with his superb footbal skills and acumen!;. Great, take the bait ya mental midget and let the WR drop to the flat and you will be exploited.

It is a good story.

The comments to this entry are closed.

MikeyBoy Brown Twitter Updates

    follow me on Twitter

    BetUs.com

    • Bet on USA's Favorite Pastime – Football Betting  at BetUS

    Bengals Futility - By The Numbers

    • 20 - Years since the Bengals have won a playoff game

      0 - Total number of playoff wins in Mike Brown's tenure as owner

      .359 - Bengals regular season winning percentage since Mike Brown took over as owner (115-206-1 in 20 seasons)

      29-34-1 - Record since 2005 playoff game vs Steelers

      6 - Seasons the Bengals have lost their first six games since 1991. No other team has more than two.

      0 - Teams North of Cincinnati without an indoor practice facility

      10 - Players arrested in a 14 month span from 2005-2006

      32 - Mike Brown's ranking, out of 32, of the "Best Owners in the NFL" by Michael Silver of Sports Illustrated in 2007

      458,000,000 - Amount, in dollars, that Hamilton County Taxpayers paid to build PBS

      2032 - Year that Hamilton County will have finally paid off its debt on the stadium deal

      3 - Total number of non-clerical employees employed in the Bengals scouting department, lowest in the league

      747,000,000 - Amount, in dollars, paid in free agency by the Bengals from 1994 - 2005, second worst of all 28 teams in existence for the duration, behind only Arizona

      118 – Ranking, out of 118 professional teams, of the “Worst Franchises” in professional sports, as ranked by ESPN the Magazine in 2003.

      97 – Ranking, out of 98 general managers in all four major sports with three or more years of experience, of Mike Brown’s performance as a GM, as ranked by Forbes in 2007.

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

    Categories

    Categories

    March 2013

    Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
              1 2
    3 4 5 6 7 8 9
    10 11 12 13 14 15 16
    17 18 19 20 21 22 23
    24 25 26 27 28 29 30
    31            
    Blog powered by Typepad